RESURGENCE #3/#6-#12. NY: Resurgence Youth Movement, July 1965-December 1966 (#3/#6-#7, #9-#10); Chicago, IL: (#8); Np., California: March 1967 (#11-#12).
RESURGENCE #3/#6-#12. NY: Resurgence Youth Movement, July 1965-December 1966 (#3/#6-#7, #9-#10); Chicago, IL: (#8); Np., California: March 1967 (#11-#12).
RESURGENCE #3/#6-#12. NY: Resurgence Youth Movement, July 1965-December 1966 (#3/#6-#7, #9-#10); Chicago, IL: (#8); Np., California: March 1967 (#11-#12).
RESURGENCE #3/#6-#12. NY: Resurgence Youth Movement, July 1965-December 1966 (#3/#6-#7, #9-#10); Chicago, IL: (#8); Np., California: March 1967 (#11-#12).
RESURGENCE #3/#6-#12. NY: Resurgence Youth Movement, July 1965-December 1966 (#3/#6-#7, #9-#10); Chicago, IL: (#8); Np., California: March 1967 (#11-#12).
RESURGENCE #3/#6-#12. NY: Resurgence Youth Movement, July 1965-December 1966 (#3/#6-#7, #9-#10); Chicago, IL: (#8); Np., California: March 1967 (#11-#12).
RESURGENCE #3/#6-#12. NY: Resurgence Youth Movement, July 1965-December 1966 (#3/#6-#7, #9-#10); Chicago, IL: (#8); Np., California: March 1967 (#11-#12).

40.

RESURGENCE #3/#6-#12. NY: Resurgence Youth Movement, July 1965-December 1966 (#3/#6-#7, #9-#10); Chicago, IL: (#8); Np., California: March 1967 (#11-#12).

Ed. Jonathan Leake and Walter Caughey. 4to. Stapled wrps. Mimeographed, rectos only. Pagination varies. Most issues printed on different colour papers. Illustrated.


Resurgence emerged following lectures given by Sam Dolgoff, Russ Blackwell and others at meetings of the Libertarian League in New York in the early 1960s attended by Jonathan Leake, then still a high school student, and Walter Caughey. Leake and Caughey billed their magazine as the organ of the Resurgence Youth Movement, said to be founded on August 10th, 1964, though its existence as a group was unclear. It first appeared in September 1964 in New York, four months after the first issue of The Rebel Worker in Chicago, both publications proclaiming a new 'World Revolution of Youth'. Later they were joined by Heatwave in London whose editor, Charles Radcliffe, had earlier connected the ideas of rock'n'roll and revolution in an article for Anarchy magazine in 1963 ('Pop Goes the Beatle'). All three journals called for a total revolution, fusing anarchist ideas with the gathering forces of youth revolt, though Resurgence went further, its apocalyptic tone verging on nihilism. Its first manifesto called for "revolutionary youth everywhere…to join us. Let there be explosions of subversive activity, ambushes on the State and its lackeys. Enemies of the State Unite!"; by the twelfth issue they were claiming that "The new man is both nihilist and humanist, destroying the old world to build a new one…The anarchists, guerilla fighters in the world revolution of youth rise up to tear down Authority, Property, Family, all the gods of bourgeois civilization. We sing the death of god and destruction of the world as we know it."


Each issue of Resurgence included a 'Teen Revolt' bulletin providing reports on youth rebellions from around the world, among them outlaw bikers, 'psychedelic youth' and their use of LSD, the Dutch Provos ('Provo' was a term Jonathan Leake also adopted), guerilla forces in South America, the Black Panthers, and anti-war groups: "World revolution of youth in America is the street gangs, the dropouts, the outlaws and dope freaks who want no part of this society. Rock'n'roll, LSD and pot, molotov cocktails, these are our answers to politics, work, and police brutality!"


The eight issues here also feature an article on 'Free Education' (alongside an announcement of the opening of the Free University of New York); the SDS's National Vietnam Examination (stapled in); several theoretical pieces, including 'Revolutionary Consciousness' by Walter Caughey; various Resurgence, Guerrilla and Cultural manifestos; radical poetry; the lyrics to 'Dancing In The Street' (with an added provocative coda, 'Burn Baby Burn'); striking graphics and typography; and extracts from Heatwave and Black Mask.


Condition varies: faint spotting and splash marks to back cover of issue #3; back cover of #6 detached from staples; front cover of #9 detached from staples; o/w Very Good or better. A scarce run of the first American magazine to recognise and espouse the revolutionary potential of disaffected youth and dissident subcultures. Provenance: Charles Radcliffe.

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