SUBURBAN PRESS #1 (London: Suburban Press, nd. [1971]).

45.

SUBURBAN PRESS #1 (London: Suburban Press, nd. [1971]).

4to. Side-stapled. 29 sheets, printed offset-litho and duplicated, rectos only.


The first of six issues published by the Suburban Press, an anarchist publishing house co-founded by Jamie Reid in 1970 with Jeremy Brook and Nigel Edwards in South Norwood as a community printing press to support squatters, the women's movement and other radical currents.


Its opening article proclaims that "This system is wrong, HERE IN ENGLAND. The system must go. Revolution is the means. Revolution is change. Revolution is every second of our lives dedicated to this end." Further articles satirise suburbia and discuss the role of art in the face of "the impending ecological crisis".


Reid's graphics, for which he would later be better known through his work for the Sex Pistols, feature prominently throughout, including the neo-situationist cartoon strip, 'Trish & Trina', "two ordinary girls" who debate Maoism but nonetheless "still believe in marriage". Another graphic, 'Be Reasonable: Take It', depicts a businessman's outstretched hand clutching a wad of cash, suggesting that money can be used to buy off trouble, an idea that was reused and elaborated on by Reid in his Pistols fanzine, 'Anarchy in the UK' (1976).


The striking back cover image of a giant poodle sitting in a pool of its own blood refers to a local newspaper report of a jewellery theft in Ascot, an affluent London suburb, during which a poodle was kicked to death, a story that for Reid, who grew up in Shirley, a 1930s 'dream suburb' east of Croydon, encapsulated his ambivalence about the suburban dream.


Small note in red ink to upper right corner of front cover; partial offsetting to upper and right edges of back cover; o/w a Very Good plus copy of the rare first issue of Reid's self-described "shit-stirring" magazine, a precursor to the homemade punk aesthetic that he subsequently helped define.

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