THE HARVARD ADVOCATE Volume CXXVIII No. 1, Volume CXXIX No. 2, and Volume CXXIX No. 3 (Cambridge, Mass.: September - December 1955).
THE HARVARD ADVOCATE Volume CXXVIII No. 1, Volume CXXIX No. 2, and Volume CXXIX No. 3 (Cambridge, Mass.: September - December 1955).
THE HARVARD ADVOCATE Volume CXXVIII No. 1, Volume CXXIX No. 2, and Volume CXXIX No. 3 (Cambridge, Mass.: September - December 1955).

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THE HARVARD ADVOCATE Volume CXXVIII No. 1, Volume CXXIX No. 2, and Volume CXXIX No. 3 (Cambridge, Mass.: September - December 1955).

4to. Illustrated wrps., 20pp., 24pp., and 28pp. Three consecutive issues of Harvard's collegiate literary magazine, printing two poems and a short story by Piero Heliczer.

The two poems, in the first and third of the issues, are "The Salesmen In Their Youth" and "Conduct Since Birth"; the 4pp. short story, printed in the November issue, is entitled "The Tree of Knowledge Tree".

An unattributed review from January 1956, printed in the daily college newspaper, The Harvard Crimson, assesses his poem in the December issue, "Conduct Since Birth", as being "fairly good, but parts of it are incomprehensible, and in this particular poem there seems utterly no need for his lower case letters."

Heliczer left Harvard abruptly before he was due to graduate. The reasons are unclear, but both Gavin Scott in his article in Ivy Magazine, and his half-sister, Marisabena, have said that he was expelled, possibly due to his removal of the recently donated bronze bust of the Roman empress Julia Domna from Harvard's Fogg Museum, which he had secretely kept on the mantelpiece in his dorm room.

Whatever the explanation, it was around this time that Heliczer's mental ill health began to manifest itself, and he was hospitalised in White Plains at the New York-Cornell Medical Centre shortly after leaving Harvard.

September issue Very Good plus; wrappers of November and December issues stained, the latter with staples rusted, Good only. Piero's own copies, though not indicated as such.

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