Ten typed letters, nine of them with holograph additions, drawings and other embellishments; one typed postcard; one autograph postcard; and one autograph aerogramme from Michael Horovitz to Piero Heliczer, c. May-November, 1959.
Ten typed letters, nine of them with holograph additions, drawings and other embellishments; one typed postcard; one autograph postcard; and one autograph aerogramme from Michael Horovitz to Piero Heliczer, c. May-November, 1959.
Ten typed letters, nine of them with holograph additions, drawings and other embellishments; one typed postcard; one autograph postcard; and one autograph aerogramme from Michael Horovitz to Piero Heliczer, c. May-November, 1959.
Ten typed letters, nine of them with holograph additions, drawings and other embellishments; one typed postcard; one autograph postcard; and one autograph aerogramme from Michael Horovitz to Piero Heliczer, c. May-November, 1959.
Ten typed letters, nine of them with holograph additions, drawings and other embellishments; one typed postcard; one autograph postcard; and one autograph aerogramme from Michael Horovitz to Piero Heliczer, c. May-November, 1959.

38.

Ten typed letters, nine of them with holograph additions, drawings and other embellishments; one typed postcard; one autograph postcard; and one autograph aerogramme from Michael Horovitz to Piero Heliczer, c. May-November, 1959.

Correspondence dating from the period just before and immediately after the launch of Michael Horovitz's New Departures magazine, in which Heliczer's poem, "paris a scenario for a silent movie", appeared as the first contribution, marking his first appearance in print in Britain. The letters demonstrate their mutually supportive relationship at the beginning of their writing and publishing careers: Horovitz stayed with Heliczer in Paris in the summer of 1959, and a few months later they travelled together around Britain with the first Live New Departures troupe ("I much look forward to your coming and anna the violinist please do bring some pulp mags and a printing press"). Ten years later, Horovitz included Heliczer in his landmark anthology, "Children of Albion: Poetry of the Underground in Britain", only his third appearance in an anthology.

The earliest letter, an autograph aerogramme, dated May 3, 1959, marks the beginning of their friendship: "Dear Piero Heliczer, I'm co-editing what is now called new departures with David Sladen - thanks for the poems - we're using paris only in the first issue as it's packed full to overflowing with good things", ending: "Do you think you cld place & sell many copies in Paris, Amsterdam, anywhere?... you'd get 100fr. for each copy sold."

Considerable content in the subsequent correspondence relates to their arrangements for the exchange, sale and distribution of New Departures and Dead Language Press publications, with Horovitz requesting specific titles from Heliczer. Throughout, Horovitz's discursive style mixes practical matters with poetic interludes in continuous and unpunctated streams of writing, resembling Heliczer's own idiosyncratic use of language. Several letters are embellished with drawings or rudimentary collages, and at least two feature stand-alone poems (rather than poetic prose), one of them titled "o de piers pont".

The correspondence makes references in passing to Gregory Corso, Brion Gysin, Cornelius Cardew, "john cage wishes to bring merce cunningham dancers to england for live september", "david [Sladen] asked kerouac and ginsberg likely to come also", and William Burroughs: "best was bum kicks with burroughs mescaline in earls court he the intellegsual cowboy". This was a reference to the occasion when Horovitz brought some mescaline to Burroughs at the Empress Hotel, and the hallucinatory visit to a transport café in Earl's Court that ensued. One letter highlights the difficulty of importing copies of 'The Naked Lunch' into Britain: "three people who will pay for it want to peruse a naked lunch if you cant bring these within one month please send them at once naked lunch must be by personal mercury as customs officials of post like getting indigestation".

Also included are two of Horovitz's holograph notes for Dead Language Press orders, one of them written on an envelope bearing Heliczer's printed address (18 rue Descartes), and a short holograph note to Piero Heliczer from Hoppy (John Hopkins). In it, he relays a message from Horovitz "who wants a lot of printed poems etc & have got fr. 3000 for you. Man, the spirit moves & I must leave Paris tomorrow morning… Do you know OM? I mean where is? See you Hoppy". Hoppy was part of Horovitz's circle of friends at Oxford, and later had a relationship with Kate Heliczer; sometime in 1965 he visited New York and took a sequence of rarely seen photographs of Piero Heliczer, some of them including his girlfriend, Irene Nolan, their dalmation (Jock), and Angus MacLise in their apartment at 450 Grand Street (soon to be occupied by the Velvet Underground).

Sold