SCUM Manifesto, subtitled "This is the CORRECT Valerie Solanas edition" Valerie SOLANAS.
SCUM Manifesto, subtitled "This is the CORRECT Valerie Solanas edition".
SCUM Manifesto, subtitled "This is the CORRECT Valerie Solanas edition".
SCUM Manifesto, subtitled "This is the CORRECT Valerie Solanas edition".
SCUM Manifesto, subtitled "This is the CORRECT Valerie Solanas edition".
SCUM Manifesto, subtitled "This is the CORRECT Valerie Solanas edition".
SCUM Manifesto, subtitled "This is the CORRECT Valerie Solanas edition".

115.

SCUM Manifesto, subtitled "This is the CORRECT Valerie Solanas edition".

NY: self-published, May 1977. Pamphlet, tabloid newspaper format, 7pp., folded for mailing.

SIGNED and inscribed on the front cover: "To Moonyean Love Valerie Solanas". Solanas has written the recipient's name and address in blue ink on the back cover, which is postmarked June 2, 1977, almost exactly nine years to the day after she shot Andy Warhol.

The recipient, Moonyean Grosch, owned Womansplace, a bookstore catering to the feminist and LGBT communities in Phoenix, Arizona. A hand addressed postcard from Solanas to Grosch is laid in (postmarked July 1, 1977), together with a typed correction slip that was originally taped to the back, also bearing the recipient's handwritten address and the author's return address.

Valerie Solanas's second self-published edition, and her final attempt to reassert authorial control from Maurice Girodias after the Olympia Press went bankrupt in 1973. In the introduction she expresses her frustration that Girodias included none of the corrections she wanted in his Olympia edition and argues that it contained many "typographical errors: words and even extended parts of sentences left out, rendering the passages they should've been in incoherent." She concludes: "This is the SCUM Manifesto that would've been published in 1968, if I'd had my way."

The intention of SCUM (printed as a noun rather than an acronym in this edition) is announced on the front cover: "eliminate through sabotage all aspects of society not relevant to women (everything), bring about a complete female take-over, completely automate, eliminate the male sex and begin to create a far-out, funky female world." On the last page Solanas makes it known that "I'll let anybody who wants to hawk it - women, men, Hare Krishna, Daughters of the American Revolution, the American Legion. Maurice Girodias, you're always in financial straits. Here's your big chance - hawk SCUM Manifesto. You can peddle it around the massage parlor district. Anita Bryant, finance your anti-fag campaign selling the only book worth selling - SCUM Manifesto. Andy Warhol, peddle it at all those hot shit parties you go to." Finally, she adds: "Minimum orders for peddlers is 200. No credit, no discounts. I don't like arithmetic. And don't have gang wars over territories - that's not nice."

It seems clear from the correction slip, long since removed from the postcard, allowing it to be fully opened, that Solanas continued to edit and amend even her own 'correct' version. After spending the preceding years in and out of prison and various psychiatric institutions, Solanas also continued to promote it (she sold copies of this edition on the New York streets for $2), while still maintaining that her shooting of Warhol was a moral act: "And I consider it immoral that I missed. I should have done target practice." ('Valerie Solanas Replies', Village Voice, August 1, 1977).

Only two copies of this edition have been located in institutional collections in the United States (Columbia and Harvard Universities), and it seems almost as rare as the original mimeo. Apart from the defaced 1971 British Olympia Press edition held in the Manuscripts and Archives Division of the New York Public Library, copies of any edition signed or inscribed by Valerie Solanas are seldom heard of (only one such copy of this edition can be located, recently donated by the Italian feminist Edda Billi to the Casa Internazionale delle Donne in Rome). A year before she died even Solanas herself did not possess a copy: in 1987, shortly after Andy Warhol's death, she asked Ultra Violet, who had tracked her down to San Francisco, "Do you have the newspaper edition of the manifesto? I don't have a copy anymore."

Paper evenly toned, with minor edgewear, o/w an exceptional copy of one of the twentieth century's most notorious and influential feminist polemics.

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