CONTROL #1-5 (London: Stephen Willats, 1965-1969).
CONTROL #1-5 (London: Stephen Willats, 1965-1969).
CONTROL #1-5 (London: Stephen Willats, 1965-1969).
CONTROL #1-5 (London: Stephen Willats, 1965-1969).
CONTROL #1-5 (London: Stephen Willats, 1965-1969).

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CONTROL #1-5 (London: Stephen Willats, 1965-1969).

Titled Control Magazine from issue #3 onwards. Each sm. folio (34.3x6.6cm.); subsequent issues were reduced in size. Saddle-stapled. B/w with one-colour screenprinted wrappers (#1-2), two or more colour screenprinted wrappers (#3-5). Each 12pp.-20pp. Illustrated.

Founded by artist Stephen Willats in 1965, and ongoing still, Control was named after the cybernetic concept of self-determinism, its purpose to provide a forum for artists to discuss their work and to make connections with social or computer sciences and new technologies. The large purple dot on the cover of the inaugural issue (designed along with the magazine's futuristic logo by Dean Bradley of the Push Pin Studios in New York and Design Communications in the UK) was intended to represent the concept of the node, a point of connection in a communications network.

The editorial statement in the first issue announced that "Control's main function will be to publish articles by the personalities which make up the new attitude in visual communication." Willats used the magazine's pages as a vehicle to articulate his ideas and projects, while encouraging other artists to control the discourse about their own work and challenge art historians, stating in the fifth issue: "Fundamentally the concepts that Control Magazine is proposing are directly opposed to the art establishment structure as it stands at the moment...".

Contributors to this scarce early run include Adrian Berg; Roy Ascott; Tom Phillips; Peter Stroud; Joe Tilson; Peter Cook (a double-page orthographic Archigram drawing, "Anarchy City!"); John Latham; John Sharkey; Douglas Sandle; Don Mason; Logie Barrow; and Victor Burgin. The third issue includes a tipped-in envelope containing "Three Light Modulators"; an original fold-out drawing in green, purple and pink wax crayons by Peter Upward; and "Poem Blanc", an interactive visual poem by John Sharkey.

Slight rubbing to wrappers of issue #3, o/w all issues Near Fine or Fine. The print run for each issue was no more than 650 copies.

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