FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).
FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).

52.

FEMINIST ART JOURNAL (The) #1-18 (of 19 issued).

Brooklyn, NY: April 1972-Spring 1977. First nine issues tabloid newspaper format, folded (20pp-28pp.); then glossy magazine format (40pp.-56pp.). Illustrated.

A near complete run of this feminist journal, lacking only the final issue. It was founded in 1972 by Cindy Nemser, Pat Mainardi and Irene Moss with the aim "to enhance the status of women in all the arts by publishing articles on their past history and on their current history making activities".

In addition, the opening editorial states its intention was to "expose and discredit all personages and institutions which exploit or discriminate against women artists". For example, in her article in the first issue, "Stereotypes and Women Artists", Nemser argues that male critics routinely use language to demean and undermine the art of women. Similarly, her article in the second issue, "Egomania and the Male Artist", calls out Richard Serra for telling her to fuck off when she tried to interview him, and accuses Vito Acconci of having an inappropriate relationship with a student. Both issues feature a column titled "Male Chauvinist Exposé", naming artists, critics and others in the art world who treated their female colleagues disrespectfully.

Throughout its five-year run the journal featured essays on women working in film, photography, music, theatre, architecture, and literature, as well as painting, and the list of interviewees includes Louise Nevelson; Eva Hesse; Barbara Hepworth; Marisol; Betsy Jolas; Erica Jong; May Stevens; Carla Bley; Yvonne Rainer; Betye Saar; Isabel Bishop; Lynn Miller; Martha Coolidge; Janet Fish; Lotte Lenya; Diane Burko; and Kate Millett.

Most of the articles are written by women (though not exclusively; in 1974 Nemser described the journal as "moderate" and "not militant or anti-male"), among them Robin Morgan; Faith Ringgold; Lila Katzen (also interviewed by Nemser); Kathie Sarachild (whose mother Sara coined the term 'Sisterhood is Powerful'); Patricia Sloane; Gloria Orenstein (on Surrealist women); June Blum; Marcia Tucker; Judy Seigel; Miriam Brumer; Monica Sjöö; Shirley Boccaccio; Lucy Lippard; Rachel Maines; Lisa Lyons; (poems by) Marge Piercy; and Barbara Jepson.

Also prints letters from, among many, Joan Mitchell, Ray Johnson, Gregory Battcock, and Yvonne Rainer, along with extensive reviews of books, films, music and exhibitions (including Laurie Anderson at the Holly Solomon Gallery).

Mailing address to tabloid editions, with occasional ink inscriptions to covers and minor wear and tear; magazine editions Very Good plus, with mailing labels to back covers of some.

Overall an excellent and almost complete run of this pioneering feminist journal, providing a valuable resource documenting attitudes toward feminism and art in the 1970s.

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