PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).
PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).

97.

PERFORMANCE MAGAZINE #1-21 (London: June 1979 - December/January 1983).

4to. Stapled wrps., 22pp-56pp. Illustrated. Ed. Rob La Frenais.

The first 21 issues of this wide-ranging countercultural magazine, founded by Rob La Frenais in 1979 with the aim of promoting cross-disciplinary live performance and underground art. In the first issue, he wrote: "There are still some events worth stifling a yawn for… They are difficult to pin down… to separate from the sludge of spectacle… they consist of people doing odd things in front of others. They are performances. Anyone can do one but once money changes hands their value is under scrutiny… The performances we cover have been called Fringe Theatre, Performance Art, and Community Art. We are responding to, and adding to, a vastly increased interest in these things, but we will be critical in our approach" (the definition soon widened to encompass music and dance).

The magazine ran for 66 issues (up until 1992), and although it received Arts Council funding later on, these early issues coincided with the election of Thatcher and her government's cuts to public subsidies. In the second issue, La Frenais wondered if "the hardening resolve of the Tory government in their fund-raising efforts for the rich mean the end of the limited breathing space allowed for development of performance outside theatres and galleries", and questioned the increasing commodification of art.

The feminist movement was growing in strength during the same period, and the magazine devoted more coverage to women than most art magazines of the day. It was similarly supportive of gay and lesbian artists and collectives in the face of the Tories' anti-gay legislation, and the run includes coverage of companies such as Gay Sweatshop and The Brixton Fairies.

These early issues represent a chronicle of the growth of performance/live art in the UK, along with the political and cultural changes that accompanied it. Among its contributors were Bryony Lavery; Angela Carter; Jeff Nuttall; Neil Hornick; Andrea Hill; Roger Ely; Paul Burwell; Ian Hinchcliffe; Val Wilmer; and the editor. The list of interviewees is particularly impressive, and included in the run are interviews with, among others, Ken Campbell; Julian Beck; Genesis P-Orridge (twice); John Dowie; Fiona Richmond; John Cage; Merce Cunningham; Robert Wilson; Pip Simmons; Ivor Cutler; Brion Gysin; Laurie Anderson; Andre Stitt; Robyn Archer; and Cathy Berberian.

The feature articles are eclectic, and include pieces on Dirk Larsen; Snoo Wilson; the Feminist Improvisation Group; Stuart Brisley; Chris Burden; Video Art; London Musicians Collective; Catherine Elwes; Gilbert & George; Aleister Crowley; Nigel Rolfe; Anne Bean; and the Neo-Naturists, among much else. Reviews feature strongly too, including concerts by Captain Beefheart; James Chance; The Penguin Café Orchestra; Cecil Taylor Unit; as well as the multimedia Final Academy series.

Also included is issue #25, which includes an interview with Joseph Beuys, a feature on The Residents, and a flexi-disc by The Basement Group, an experimental co-operative formed in Newcastle in 1979.

Subscription form clipped from issue #17, o/w all 21 magazines (#20/21 is a double issue) in Very Good condition.

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